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Item 41 - Gordon Cooper’s Mercury 9 Flown Survival Radio Catalog 451 (Apr 2015)

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(we are no longer accepting bids on this item)
Minimum Bid: $300.00
Sold Price: $12,572.18 (includes buyer's premium)

Description


Important flown survival radio transceiver carried on Mercury-Atlas 9, measuring 3 x 4.75 x .75, bearing an affixed label reading: “Rescue Beacon Transceiver, Model SCL314A-1, Serial No. 102, McDonnell 45-85706, ITT Kellogg, Ft. Wayne, Indiana.” The radio is constructed of a purple metal body with a black wire extending from the top attached to a small earpiece and microphone. A braided cord with a black metal hook is attached at the bottom. Includes the original batteries, labeled "Mallory, Mercury Battery for Electronic Equipment, TR-135R, 6.75 Volts." Some corrosion to the batteries, otherwise overall fine condition. Accompanied by a handwritten and signed letter of provenance from Gordon Cooper, in full: "This survival radio was carried by Gordon Cooper on Mercury 9 on 15–16 May 1963 for 22 orbits in space," and also accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from Steve Zarelli for the Cooper letter. An extraordinary piece, especially considering the malfunction in Cooper’s spacecraft that forced him to take manual control—luckily Gordon’s skill as a pilot allowed him to land safely, just four miles from the prime recovery ship. Had the malfunction forced him to land elsewhere and he became lost at sea, this radio could have made the difference between life and death. A remarkable, historic piece from the last Mercury mission.

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