Lot #2278
Apollo 11 LM Descent Stage Kapton Foil

This lot has closed

Estimate: $400+

The 30 Minute Rule begins October 17 at 7:00 PM. An Initial Bid Must Be Placed By October 17 at 6:00 PM To Participate After 6:00 PM

Description

Large 6.5" x 4.75" swatch of Kapton foil removed from the descent stage of the Lunar Module Eagle mere days before the historic launch of the Apollo 11 mission, with the swatch bearing an area of Kapton H-film tape, which was used to seal seams and attach foil to the lunar module. In fine condition. It is important that this large swatch of Kapton comes from the descent stage of the Lunar Module, which was left behind on the lunar surface—despite not being flown, this Kapton is the only source for actual material that came from the Apollo 11 LM descent stage. It is therefore extremely desirable in comparison to the small, commonly available flown fragments taken from the CM following splashdown.

Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Lee R. Brandt, the lead technician of Propulsion and Environmental controls for Grumman's lunar module support team at the Kennedy Space Center, who notes: "At the end of June, 1969, during the Countdown Demonstration Test…I was asked to do an emergency squib valve replacement within LM-5's descent stage. At the time, Apollo 11 was staged for launch on Launch Pad 39A, and we had to enter the SLA…where the Lunar Module 'Eagle' was secure within the Saturn V rocket. As with most repairs on the 'LEM,' as we referred to it, Kapton foil insulating blankets (as much as 25 layers) had to be removed and replaced in order to gain access to the affected areas. Realizing the historical significance of Kapton foil removed from Eagle only days before its launch, I saved the sheets I removed for posterity…For my contributions to the LM-5 repairs, I received NASA's coveted Silver Snoopy award." Also accompanied by a copy of a letter from future Apollo 12 moonwalker Alan Bean, conveying to Brandt the referenced 'Silver Snoopy' award.

Auction Info

  • Auction Title: Space & Aviation
  • Dates: October 11 - October 17